Clinical and Pharmaceutical Electrophoresis


Cellas Electrophoresis System


Key Features
Compact high resolution system for clinical electrophoresis
Accommodates strips and gels up to 24x20cm
Complete range of cellulose acetate gels and kits
Densitometer software and scanner available

Description
The ideal tank for standard membrane and gel cellulose acetate techniques, the Cellas electrophoresis system is designed and built to our high quality standard to address both routine clinical and research requirements. Two adjustable supports, which can be positioned anywhere within the tank, readily accommodate different lengths of dry cellulose acetate membrane to a maximum 20cm



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COMPAC-50 HTP Comet Assay Tank


Key Features
Unique patent pending design.
Highly compact design.
50 slides run in 20 mins.
Carriers reduce manual handling and decrease the risk of damage/loss of fragile LMP gels

Description
Developed in collaboration with the Oxidative Stress group at the University of Leicester, the COMPAC-50 is a high throughput electrophoresis system, available exclusively through Cleaver Scientific, to perform the Comet Assay, otherwise known as Single Cell Gel Electrophoresis.  A unique patent pending design employs two carriers to hold a total of 50 slides (25 per carrier) in a vertical laminar orientation.  This provides two distinct advantages over conventional Comet Assay systems: firstly, to produce a highly compact, small footprint system whose economical use of buffer optimises the electrophoretic conditions; and, secondly, by holding 25 slides within a rack this allows all of the slides to be processed in one batch which dramatically reduces assay time.  Consequently, this is not only beneficial for electrophoresis but also in the lysis, neutralisation, staining and washing steps of the Comet Assay, when each batch of slides may be treated during each step respectively using the four ebony acrylic staining dishes supplied.  In addition, the COMPAC-50 benefits from a high performance ceramic cooling base with sliding drawer to accommodate a cool pack, which is frozen before use, to maintain optimal buffer temperature.
The COMPAC-50 marks the first of a new range of innovative systems designed specifically for rapid high throughput single cell gel electrophoresis.


Comet Assay Tanks



Key Features
For Single Cell Gel Electrophoresis
Minimise exposure to light and reduce background DNA damage
High efficiency cooling for enhanced resolution

Description
Cleaver Scientific Comet Assay Tanks are available in four slide formats to study single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE), a technique made popular by drug toxicology and carcinogenesis studies for the detection and quantifation of DNA damage in cells. Each tank’s robust construction from ebony acrylic ensures that cells remain free of exposure to background light and DNA damage during electrophoresis, while a cooled central platform provides a convenient surface for slide preparation and control of slide temperature during the assay. Following electrophoresis DNA damage may be measured using Comet Assay scoring software.
Background: First introduced in 1981 to quantify double-stranded DNA breakages in single cells exposed to irradiation, the Comet Assay (or SCGE) has since been adapted to analyse specific DNA lesions and repair processes.
Overview: Following genotoxic insult, such as ionizing radiation, the resultant strand breakage of supercoiled duplex DNA reduces the size of the large genomic DNA from which these strands are separated or drawn out by electrophoresis. The genomic DNA then takes on the appearance of a comet as its negatively charged broken ends and fragments migrate towards the anode during electrophoresis.
Method: After exposure to a genotoxic insult cells are suspended within low melting point agarose and embedded within a thin layer of agarose on a microscope slide. Cellular protein is then removed by lysis in detergent, when DNA is allowed to unwind in alkaline conditions before electrophoresis. The DNA is electrophoresed, stained and then analysed using software.
Results: Microscopy imaging is used to measure DNA fluorescence upon staining. In DNA damaged cells the resultant image resembles a ‘comet’ with the cellular DNA separated into a head and tail. The head is mainly composed of intact genomic DNA, whereas any fragmented or damaged DNA is concentrated within and towards the tail.



 
 
 
 
PT. SPEKTRA SURYA UTAMA
 
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